Food Wastage and its impact on environment

The reason why many issues gripping the world still continue to linger is because we do not consider them serious enough, or worthy enough of spending our precious time tackling them. Wastage of food is one such problem.  Although for many people, food makes up for a relatively small percentage of their household budgets; and for many growers, retailers and distributors, selling more food leads to obvious incentives, wastage of food still remains a disturbing fact because of its various environmental impacts. Up to 40% of the food produced in the US goes to waste. This is not just a huge waste of calories but also of the freshwater, energy, pesticides and manpower that went into production, distribution and sales.

When wasted food is dumped into landfills, it produces methane (25% to be precise) which is a greenhouse gas. This way wastage of food also contributes to climate change. A report by Dana Gunders, at the Natural Resources Defense Council makes the following four recommendations:

  1. “A comprehensive study for food losses in our food system” must be conducted by the government and also “clarify the meaning of date labels on food so that consumers stop throwing out items due to misinterpretation.”
  2. State and local governments should set their own targets, “implementing food waste prevention campaigns in their jurisdictions as well as their own operations.”
  3. Businesses should try to understand “the extent and opportunity of their own waste streams and adopting best practices.”
  4. We all can help reduce food wastage “by learning when food goes bad, buying imperfect produce, and storing and cooking food with an eye to reducing waste.”

The following infographic from UK food industry magazine Next Generation Food illustrates the environmental impact of wasted food:

 

Feature Image: http://bit.ly/RPAvjc

The following two tabs change content below.

Dhanika

A Mass Media graduate, Dhanika joined Consumer Instinct in the summer of 2012. With a major in Advertising, she enjoys reading and writing about anything to do with Branding and Marketing. At CI, she largely covers Consumer Behavior and Marketing, yet likes exploring the area of Arts and Culture. When not working, Dhanika takes pleasure in reading, clicking pictures and more often than not, debating. A self proclaimed ‘part-feminist’, the alluring smell of coffee never ceases to attract her.

Comments

comments

About Dhanika
A Mass Media graduate, Dhanika joined Consumer Instinct in the summer of 2012. With a major in Advertising, she enjoys reading and writing about anything to do with Branding and Marketing. At CI, she largely covers Consumer Behavior and Marketing, yet likes exploring the area of Arts and Culture. When not working, Dhanika takes pleasure in reading, clicking pictures and more often than not, debating. A self proclaimed ‘part-feminist’, the alluring smell of coffee never ceases to attract her.
Add Comment Register



Leave a comment